Инстаграм National Geographic

@natgeo
Официальный инстаграм National Geographic
Подписчики 131M(за неделю +104K, за месяц +1.32M)
Подписки 133Публикаций 21930
Город Вашингтон, США
Возраст 131 год
День рождения 1 октябряЗнак зодиака Весы
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 15 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by @brentstirton | Today is World Pangolin Day. Here’s one of these unique and fascinating animals in the loving arms of a caregiver from the #tikkihywoodtrust in Zimbabwe. Tragically, this rescued animal represents the world’s most trafficked mammal, with over a million pangolins disappearing into the Asian trade over the last ten years. Pangolin scale seizures have been huge in recent years, with a pattern that seems to suggest it is superseding ivory as a business for traffickers. Recent findings by Chinese researchers have established that pangolins carry viruses that are closely related to 2019-nCoV, the current coronavirus. Two researchers at South China Agricultural University in Guangzhou suggest the pangolin is a potential source of 2019-nCoV, based on a genetic comparison of coronaviruses taken from the animals and from humans infected in the outbreak. The sequences are 99% similar. China is already addressing the illegal pangolin trade; as of January, the country’s national insurance program no longer covers medicines containing pangolin products. Now with the evidence that pangolins could be a vector for the current outbreak, China is seriously reconsidering its wildlife consumption. Given the ongoing cost of this outbreak, this may be one of the few silver linings. #pangolins #virus #WorldPangolinDay #conservation #endangeredspecies
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 15 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by @thomaspeschak | This is one of the first photographs I ever took of a great white shark, made around 2002. Shot on slide film off the coast of South Africa, the energy and power that exudes from this apex predator nearly leaping out of the frame are still so palpable 18 years later. For more images of great white sharks follow @thomaspeschak.
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 15 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by @jasperdoest | Flamingo Bob keeps an eye on the world while resting. Have you ever noticed a sleeping flamingo standing on one leg and maintaining perfect posture? This is because birds, like fish, also possess the ability to sleep with half of their brains. In the flamingo’s case, this is thought to allow them to keep standing on the leg that is controlled by the "awake" side of the brain, while the other brain hemisphere sleeps, allowing them to lower their metabolism and reap sleep’s other benefits. Some can even sleep with one eye open. This ability is called unihemispheric slow-wave sleep, and it is believed to help animals be alert to potential predators. Find out more about Flamingo Bob in the February issue of the magazine or follow @jasperdoest. #birdrescue #flamingo #prettyinpink #flamingobob Check out Nat Geo's Instagram story today for more.
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 14 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by Robin Hammond @Hammond_Robin | This Valentine's Day I’m thinking about Abdesattar (left) and his boyfriend, Walid (right), from Tunisia. Because of hostile attitudes toward same-sex relationships in the region and laws that make some consensual same-sex acts a crime, they had kept their relationship hidden. “We moved from place to place, lied to families and friends. We had to pretend, and to be someone else,” said Walid. “We love each other and we will never give up on each other, whatever happens.” As a symbol of their commitment, they tattooed each other's names on their chests. In an act of defiance, they took off their tops to show their tattoos—they would not hide their love any longer. They chose to tell their story for my project that amplifies the voices of #LGBTQ people around the world. @WhereLoveIsIllegal #valentinesday
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 14 февраля 2020
natgeo Photos by @estherhorvath | How do you prepare for the largest Arctic Ocean science expedition in history—which lasts a year and is not only weeks away from the nearest civilization but will be under the cover of total darkness for six months? Participants in the MOSAiC expedition, which embarked on September 20, had to undergo intense safety and security training to prepare for working on the sea ice and be able to handle any emergency situation. They had to learn how rescue themselves and others in different situations, like using a life raft or a helicopter in case of an abandoned ship, or how to fight fire on the vessel. The training also included polar bear safety—to protect both participants and polar bears—which is required in order to work in the land of polar bears. This is from the @natgeo article, "Scientists are about to spend a year trapped in Arctic ice.”
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 14 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by @FransLanting | We celebrate World Bonobo Day (February 14) with this image. You’re looking at a female bonobo playing with an infant by balancing it on her feet—a game any human parent can relate to. Bonobos engage in social interactions that we have long associated as exclusively human: They play, and express empathy. Compared with chimps, bonobo brains appear to be more developed in areas vital to emotions, such as feeling empathy and sensing distress in others. I made this image at @Lolayabonobo, a remarkable sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where individual animals confiscated from the illegal wildlife trade are given a new lease on life. Perhaps fewer than 10,000 bonobos live in the jungles of the Congo Basin, the only place where they occur in the wild. Their survival depends on our ability to apply the same kind of compassion for them that we cherish so much in ourselves. Follow me @FransLanting and Christine Eckstrom for more stories about the connections between us and our relatives on the great tree of life. @thephotosociety #Bonobos #Chimps #Apes #Play #WorldBonoboDay
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 14 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by @lucasfogliaphoto | In order to catch people hunting off season, rangers at the Wyoming Game and Fish Department office in Pinedale brought a taxidermic elk into the wild and waited for someone to shoot at it.
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 14 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown | On the ground floor of an apartment building in Centro Habana, an area in Havana, Cuba, a makeshift barbershop services both passersby and residents.
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 14 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by @paulnicklen | A fisherman changes his fly on the Hvita River, in Iceland. The country boasts the cleanest and healthiest salmon rivers in the world. Although Iceland does not have the largest trophy fish, they do have extremely healthy returns. Many scientists attribute this to the lack of fish farms in key areas where wild adult and smolt salmon leave and return to the rivers. In Canada, open-net fish farms, located along migratory paths of wild salmon, are destroying ecosystems and poisoning wild salmon stocks. Follow me @PaulNicklen to learn more about sustainable fisheries and how we can make choices that are also good for our ocean. #TurningTheTide #ExtinctionEndsHere #Beauty #Iceland
National Geographic в инстаграм – фото от 13 февраля 2020
natgeo Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | The Sahara was once a much wetter place than it is today, and you can see that in the lakes of northern Chad. Freshwater that fell from rains thousands of years ago is still seeping out of the sands along the edge of the lake. It irrigates the date palms on the shore before it evaporates under the relentless sun and incessant winds. Climate change is nothing new here; it’s just happening a lot faster. #hyperarid #paramotor To explore more of our earth from above, follow @geosteinmetz.